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Research and Evaluation
Kola Sunmonu, PhD.
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Last modified: 7/23/2014 3:34:28 PM
Research and Evaluation
Publications

  Characteristics of High-Performing Title I Schools in Prince George’s County Public Schools, SY2008 to SY2010

Cecily Darden Adams

 

Abstract

More than half of Prince George’s County Public Schools (PGCPS) students live in poverty.  The federal Title I program provides an additional funding stream to support such children.  Forty-one PGCPS elementary schools received Title I funding throughout SY2008-SY2010.  However, little is known about the characteristics of high-performing Title I schools and any distinguishing characteristics. This report identifies the high-performing Title I schools in PGCPS and examines the characteristics of these schools relative to each other, other Title I schools in PGCPS, and the schools identified as low-performing PGCPS Title I schools.  High-performing Title I schools were identified as those schools meeting the annual measureable objective (AMO) on the reading and math MSA throughout SY2008-SY2010.  Low-performing Title I schools were identified as schools in Maryland state comprehensive school improvement since SY2008 which did not exit prior to SY2010.  Five high-performing (Calverton, Gladys Noon Spellman, Lewisdale, Robert Frost, Seat Pleasant) and six low-performing (Carmody Hills, Judge Sylvania Woods, Ridgecrest, Templeton, Thomas Claggett, Thomas Stone) Title I elementary schools were identified using this sampling framework. The study included twenty-two indicators that might distinguish high-performing schools.  As expected, high-performing Title I schools have a statistically significant higher distribution of students who are proficient or above on the reading and math MSA.   Additionally, a positive school climate, high teacher expectations and maximum opportunities to learn explain some of the performance differences found between Title I school performance groups. The performance of high-performing and low-performing Title I schools is further distinguished by average class size, greater staff stability and the implementation of the Comprehension Toolkit program.  Student characteristics did not distinguish Title I schools.  However, high-performing Title I schools were found to have significantly higher average class sizes and a higher percentage of teachers who remained at the school than low-performing Title I schools.

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    Did You Know?

    Participation in Advanced Placement (AP) courses is on the rise; an increase of 15 percentage-points since SY2009

    FYI:  

    More than 33,600 students, 9,000 parents, and 5,700 teachers participated in the 2017 School Climate Survey.

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