• School Supplies List

    Schools Supplies

    Please see your welcome back letters and an additional copy of your supply list on Rally Hood.

     Primary School Supply List 2017-2018 

    • Backpack (no Wheels) labeled with your child's name on the inside of the bag and large enough to hold a 9 x 12 folder  
    • 1 package of (4) glue sticks, clear not purple
    • 1 package of sponges (4” x 3” x 6”)
    • 2 white erasers
    • 1 10 count package of Crayola® markers 
    • 1 package of watercolor paint and paper 
    • A change of clothes labeled with the child’s name on each article of clothing in a plastic bag
    •  1 pair of Fiskars scissors
    •  1 12 count package of Colored Pencils 

     Lower Elementary School Supply List 2017-2018 

    • Backpack labeled with your child's name on the inside of the bag and large enough to hold a 9 x 12 folder (no wheels)
    • One durable plastic (must it be plastic?) expanding file folder (w/at least 5 sections and closure)
    • 4 composition books
    • 2 packs of wide ruled paper
    • 1 graph notebook (4x4 squares per inch)
    • 1 pack of index cards
    • 1 pack of glue sticks
    • 2 dozen no 2 pencils
    • 1 12 pack of colored pencils
    • 1 pair of Fiskars scissors
    • 2 pack of erasers
    • 1 clip board

     Upper Elementary School Supply List 2017-2018 

    • Backpack labeled with your child’s name on the inside of the bag and large enough to hold a 9 x 12 folder
    • 1 two inch binder
    • 1 ripper pencil case to fit in 3 ring binder
    • 6 dividers for the binder
    • 3 packs of college ruled notebook paper
    • 4 lined composition books (Reading/Language Arts, Social Studies, Science Spanish)
    • 1 graph composition notebook (Math)
    • 1 expanding file folder (7 or more compartments)
    • 5 dozen number 2 pencils (NO Lead Pencils)
    • 1 pack of colored pencils
    • 5 pink erasers
    • 1 1 hand held sharpener (with shavings case)
    • 1 protractor
    • 1 dual measurement ruler (metric and standard)
    • 3 glue sticks
    • 1 clear tape
    • 1 pair of school scissors
    • 1 container of liquid soap
    • 2 boxes of tissues

     Middle School Supply List 2017-2018

    All items must be labelled before bringing them to school. Please use a pencil case that will fit in your binder and hold a few pens and pencils at a time. All items must be stored at home or in your personal locker.

    • Backpack that can fit into a 10” x 11” x 34” locker, labeled with your child's name on the inside or outside of the bag.
    • 3" ring binder for COMPLETED/GRADED WORK and RUBRICS
    •  6 subject dividers (label with Math, Science, RELA, Social Studies, Health, Counseling)
    •  1-7 section portfolio (index folder) for HOMEWORK
    •  6 black ink pens
    •  3 dozen #2 pencils sharpened
    •  12 assorted colored pencils
    •  2 Highlighters (different colors)
    •  White Out
    •  2 packs - college rule notebook paper
    •  1 pack of graph paper 
    •  1 graph notebook for math
    •  2 composition book for RELA
    •  1 composition book for Science (6th grade only) 
    •  Protractor
    •  Ruler
    •  Compass
    •  Scissors 
    •  2 glue sticks
    •  Post-it notes
    • 2 packs of dry erase markers
    • 1 pack of black sharpies (medium print)
    • 1 Science display board (for science fair project)

     

     

    All students should have a Lunchbox or insulated bag when bringing meals to school OR meal money for the first week (Breakfast full $1.50 reduced $0.30) (Lunch full $2.60 reduced $0.40) (Milk $0.55)

    An agenda book has been purchased for all elementary and middle school students.  Please bring in $4.00

      
    Requested Donations and needs for the class:
    • Facial tissues
    • paper towels
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Liquid Soap
    • Ziplock bags
    • Disinfectant Spray
    • Eco-friendly Disinfectant Wipes (no clorox pls)
    • 2 Packs of white copy paper
     

    The Montessori approach offers a broad vision of education as an aid to life.

    Montessori is designed to help children with their task of inner construction as they grow from childhood to maturity. It succeeds because it draws its principles from the natural development of the child. The inherent flexibility allows the method to adapt to the needs of the individual, regardless of the level of ability, learning style or social maturity.

    Montessori classrooms provide a prepared environment where children are free to respond to their natural drive to work and learn. The children's inherent love of learning is encouraged by giving them opportunities to engage in spontaneous, meaningful activities under the guidance of a trained adult. Through their work, the children develop concentration, motivation, persistence, and discipline. Within this framework of order, the children progress at their own pace and rhythm, according to their individual capabilities, during the crucial years of development.

    Montessori classrooms are designed for a three year age mix to allow for both individual and social development. The more experienced children share what they have learned with those new to the group. Each child's unique personality is encouraged; each child is respected as an important member of the community.

    Discovering the joys of learning and developing social and intellectual discipline lay the foundation for a happy, productive life. The children develop an appreciation for the world while becoming responsible human beings and active members of a harmonious society.

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    Primary (3 to 6 years)

    Children in the primary program possess what Dr. Montessori called the absorbent mind, the ability to absorb all aspects of one's culture and environment without effort or fatigue. As an aid to this period of the child's self-construction, individual work is encouraged. The following areas of activity cultivate the children's adaptation and ability to express and think with clarity.

    Practical Life
    Practical life exercises instill care for self, for others, and for the environment. Activities include many of the tasks children see as part of the daily routine in their home, such as preparing food and washing dishes, along with exercises of grace and courtesy. Through these tasks, children develop muscular coordination, enabling movement and the exploration of their surroundings. They learn to work at a task from beginning to end, and develop their powers of control and concentration.
    Sensorial Materials
    Sensorial materials serve as tools for development. Children build cognitive skills, and learn to order and classify impressions by touching, seeing, smelling, tasting, listening and exploring the physical properties of their environment.
    Language Development
    Language development is vital to human development. The Montessori environment is rich in oral language opportunities, allowing the child to experience conversations, stories, and poetry. The sandpaper letters help children link sounds and symbol effortlessly, encouraging the development of written expression and reading skills. To further reading development, children are exposed to the study of grammar.
    Geography, Biology, Botany, Zoology, Art and Music
    Geography, biology, botany, zoology, art and music are presented as extensions of the sensorial and language activities. Children learn about people and cultures in other countries with an attitude of respect and admiration. Through familiarity, children come to feel connected to the global human family. Lessons and experiences with nature inspire a reverence for all life. The comprehensive art and music programs give children every opportunity to enjoy a variety of creative activities, as well as gain knowledge of the great masters.
    Mathematics
    Mathematical activities help children learn and understand the concepts of math by manipulating concrete material. This work gives children a solid understanding of basic mathematical principles, prepares them for later abstract reasoning, and helps to develop problem-solving capabilities.

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    Excerpted from "What is Montessori?", with permission from and published by Association Montessori International-USA.